Hello and any advice welcome

General MGB discussion
Britd5
Posts: 10
Joined: Sat Mar 13, 2021 6:54 am
Forename: Brian
Surname: Hughes
Location: Nottinghamshire/Derbyshire border

Hello and any advice welcome

Post by Britd5 »

First of all good morning to all, I have recently agreed to purchase an MGB roadster, 1972 and am therefore new to the MG scene.

For the past 20 years I have messed around with Landrovers and have modified and maintained them myself. I recently ventured into Triumph Spitfires for a short period and whilst I loved mine, I found it an underwhelming experience overall , mainly due to a poor paint job that had masked a load of rot ( perhaps also as I had wanted one since the age of 14 and waited 35 years to own one the novelty had worn off, but it was a good venture into the classic world and I doubled my money :D ) Notwithstanding this when I sold her I regretted it and have been toiling with thoughts of my next project ever since.

The car I’ve found is very original with no filler found and still original paint all round including the chassis and floor pans . The current owner has owned it since 1994 but has not driven her since circa 2006 due to health issues. However in that period it has always been mot’d and dry kept. Its mileage over the past 10 years is just 29 miles, which was consists of an annual trip to the local mot station and back by his friendly garage.

So I will be recommissioning her over the next months, the owner advises the engine was totally reconditioned in 1995, most of the mots have advisories on imbalanced rear brakes and worn suspension pins/bushes so the first job will be to replace the front brakes, overhaul the rear drums and change all fluids and have a good look at the suspension and steering. On start up she backfires but soon settles down once a bit of heat is circulating so any advice on what to check here will be welcome......I’m hoping maybe some fresh fuel and filters will be the answer, as the fuel pump requires a little tap to get her going.

All advice will be welcome, I’m pretty handy with a spanner, but all mechanical knowledge is self taught over 35 years of motoring. I don’t believe in paying someone to do something that I can do, enjoy and learn from!

Thanks Bri
Ian Fozzard
Posts: 578
Joined: Fri Mar 27, 2015 8:18 am
Forename: Ian
Surname: Fozzard

Re: Hello and any advice welcome

Post by Ian Fozzard »

Hello and welcome!

If you have agreed to purchase the car then I guess there is no more checking to do? In my opinion the most important checks are for corrosion in the lower half of the body as this needs to be sound and strong before you tackle anything else - you need good foundations!!

You may already know, but the sill structure is complicated and consists of a double box section on each side and is difficult to check. The jacking point in the middle of the sill may give you an indication of you try to lift the car by using it. Door gaps are also a useful guide.

I restored my car when I purchased it after 6 years from leaving the factory, so if the metal is not well protected you may find yourself doing it every 10 years!

So, make sure it is sound, cut out any rot, and be prepared to replace panels if necessary. It's time consuming but not technically difficult, and you then have a sound basis for everything else.

Let us know how you get on.

Ian F
1972 BGT, Blaze, Navy trim, recessed grill
1961 Midget, 948cc, Clipper Blue, Blue trim and weather gear
Britd5
Posts: 10
Joined: Sat Mar 13, 2021 6:54 am
Forename: Brian
Surname: Hughes
Location: Nottinghamshire/Derbyshire border

Re: Hello and any advice welcome

Post by Britd5 »

Thanks Ian, regarding cills they where the 1st area I checked and couldn’t believe it was all original and solid............all panel gaps perfect
Ian Fozzard
Posts: 578
Joined: Fri Mar 27, 2015 8:18 am
Forename: Ian
Surname: Fozzard

Re: Hello and any advice welcome

Post by Ian Fozzard »

Well that sounds excellent. Everything else is relatively straightforward.
Next thing I would do is to get a Heritage Certificate and see what the car left Abingdon with.
I'm sure folk here will be able to offer any specific advice requested.
Ian F
1972 BGT, Blaze, Navy trim, recessed grill
1961 Midget, 948cc, Clipper Blue, Blue trim and weather gear
User avatar
Peter Cresswell
Posts: 719
Joined: Fri Oct 31, 2014 10:05 am
Forename: Pete
Surname: Cresswell
Location: Stone, Staffordshire

Re: Hello and any advice welcome

Post by Peter Cresswell »

Hi Bri,
Welcome to MGB Ownership and I hope you will use this forum as often as you need. There is a wealth of knowledge behind this unassuming facade!
I note your engine was totally reconditioned in 1995 so I would suggest (unless you have evidence to show it's been done) you put getting the cylinder head converted to unleaded onto your 'to do' list. It makes ownership of the car much easier! Associated with this is to get the flexible fuel pipes renewed to ones that are ethanol proof, as shortly the UK will be upping the levels of ethanol in petrol. It is a good idea to run an MGB on super unleaded anyway as this is the closest to the 98 octane minimum the engine was designed to run on.
Hopefully the restrictions we have to live under at present will be lifted in time for the summer so you can get out and about and enjoy the car.
Pete
Pete
1969 MGB Roadster
2020 MG HS Exclusive
2007 Mercedes SLK
Plus 34 other cars since 1965
Britd5
Posts: 10
Joined: Sat Mar 13, 2021 6:54 am
Forename: Brian
Surname: Hughes
Location: Nottinghamshire/Derbyshire border

Re: Hello and any advice welcome

Post by Britd5 »

Peter Cresswell wrote: Sat Mar 13, 2021 6:28 pm Hi Bri,
Welcome to MGB Ownership and I hope you will use this forum as often as you need. There is a wealth of knowledge behind this unassuming facade!
I note your engine was totally reconditioned in 1995 so I would suggest (unless you have evidence to show it's been done) you put getting the cylinder head converted to unleaded onto your 'to do' list. It makes ownership of the car much easier! Associated with this is to get the flexible fuel pipes renewed to ones that are ethanol proof, as shortly the UK will be upping the levels of ethanol in petrol. It is a good idea to run an MGB on super unleaded anyway as this is the closest to the 98 octane minimum the engine was designed to run on.
Hopefully the restrictions we have to live under at present will be lifted in time for the summer so you can get out and about and enjoy the car.
Pete
Thanks for the welcome Pete,

Yes that’s all on the list, the owner has confirmed the head was not converted to unleaded and uses additive. The be fair that’s not high priority at present and I used additive on my spitfire as we did not know it’s history, but all pipes, oil, fuel and coolant will be one of the 1st priorities.

What parts suppliers do you all use?
User avatar
Paul Scott
Posts: 210
Joined: Mon Jan 08, 2018 8:48 pm
Forename: Paul
Surname: Scott
Location: Milton Keynes

Re: Hello and any advice welcome

Post by Paul Scott »

Hi Brian,

I use David Manners, MGOC and have used MGB Hive.

The catalogue I sent earlier shows all the original part no's which can make finding parts easier.

StaySafe

Regards
Paul
1975 MGB Roadster
Webguru for MGB Register
User avatar
Bumpa
Posts: 42
Joined: Sun Dec 13, 2020 9:58 am
Forename: Mike
Surname: Howlett

Re: Hello and any advice welcome

Post by Bumpa »

Parts suppliers - for the MGB you are spoiled for choice. I have rebuilt two MGBs using almost exclusively MGB Hive parts. They are competitively priced and give very quick delivery. I see Rimmer Bros are now doing MGB parts and I have found them very efficient for my Triumph. Brown and Gammons are highly respected in the MGCC although they can be a little bit more expensive. I won't use MGOC unless there is absolutely no alternative. When I was building my V8 conversion they couldn't have been less helpful when they sent me a part that didn't fit.

If your car has good sills you are indeed lucky. Did you realise that the sill goes from the front wheel arch right back to the rear wheel arch, so much of its length is concealed behind the wings. Also have a look at the rear of the "chassis" legs where the spring shackles are attached. Both my cars needed repairs here.

If the engine backfires I would suspect the ignition timing is not correct. But the mechanical parts are generally tough, particularly the gearbox and axle. If you have a good body the rest is easy.
Mike
1969 MGB GTV8 3.9 Conversion, 1977 Triumph Dolomite 1850HL, 1971 MGB roadster undergoing restoration.
Britd5
Posts: 10
Joined: Sat Mar 13, 2021 6:54 am
Forename: Brian
Surname: Hughes
Location: Nottinghamshire/Derbyshire border

Re: Hello and any advice welcome

Post by Britd5 »

Paul Scott wrote: Sat Mar 13, 2021 7:06 pm Hi Brian,

I use David Manners, MGOC and have used MGB Hive.

The catalogue I sent earlier shows all the original part no's which can make finding parts easier.

StaySafe

Regards
Paul
Thanks Paul.....
Britd5
Posts: 10
Joined: Sat Mar 13, 2021 6:54 am
Forename: Brian
Surname: Hughes
Location: Nottinghamshire/Derbyshire border

Re: Hello and any advice welcome

Post by Britd5 »

Bumpa wrote: Sat Mar 13, 2021 7:48 pm Parts suppliers - for the MGB you are spoiled for choice. I have rebuilt two MGBs using almost exclusively MGB Hive parts. They are competitively priced and give very quick delivery. I see Rimmer Bros are now doing MGB parts and I have found them very efficient for my Triumph. Brown and Gammons are highly respected in the MGCC although they can be a little bit more expensive. I won't use MGOC unless there is absolutely no alternative. When I was building my V8 conversion they couldn't have been less helpful when they sent me a part that didn't fit.

If your car has good sills you are indeed lucky. Did you realise that the sill goes from the front wheel arch right back to the rear wheel arch, so much of its length is concealed behind the wings. Also have a look at the rear of the "chassis" legs where the spring shackles are attached. Both my cars needed repairs here.

If the engine backfires I would suspect the ignition timing is not correct. But the mechanical parts are generally tough, particularly the gearbox and axle. If you have a good body the rest is easy.
Thanks Mike, yes I did have a good read on what to look out for prior to looking. There is a lot of overpriced tarted up cars out there where their owners think they are worth a fortune and I sort of let my heart rule my head when I bought my Spitfire. I know that the structure and bodywork is far more important and when you set a limited budget you know that a fifty year old car will come with problems so bodywork and structure was number 1 for me. I’m picking her up to suit some time off work in a few weeks time, so I’m sure I will be back then with loads of questions. :D
Post Reply